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. there is no death, just transformation. may they rest in peace. let us say amen. >> please be seated. >> let us unite our hearts in prayer. >> oh god of love and mercy, we come before you this night with broken hearts. we offer you our tears and our pain, our anger and our sorrow. oh lord there was a hole so large we wonder if even you in your greatness can fill it it as we grieve and fourn for those who are lost. each light that sits before us is a light that's been lost to our world. so many nnlt, so many breave. lord all we can do is throw ourselves upon your tender mercies trusting that you hear our prayers. we know those who are lost because their ours lord, not names on some list but our mothers or sisters, our brothers or friends, kindred all because if we did not know them ourselves we know someone who did. and so we pray, lord, for all the sowls lost and families and friends who are torn by grief. for in this moment we are all your children. a family related by your love. so help us to care for these families in their sorrow and for each other in ours. may they feel the healing embrace
. there was an iron curtain theaters used to use to prevent fires. churchill used it first in private. >> you know why? >> it was a favor for truman. that is where truman was from. >> let's get a slice of that speech. >> an iron curtain has descended across the continent. behind that line, like all the capitals of the ancient states of central and eastern europe -- berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first book, and while this is in no way a sequel it represents thoughts i had. one thing i got interested in is the question why no people went along with it. what is the mentality? what are institutional pressures? why do camp guard do what they are told to do? i decided to write about this period right after world war ii, because it was a time the soviet union had reached a height, there was an apotheosis of stalinism. it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with an economic theory
from the u.s., which was dragging its feet. the final plan, the german plan, would be to soften air bases then in lit august or september crush the remnants of the r.a.f. it was a good plan but it wasn't working and goring got hitler's permission to bomb the ports. bombing was so ineffective on both sides that meant they would be bombing houses. they did. and churchill said give it back to them. that was the beginning. so, the blitz starts on september 7, i think, the evening. and germans came 81 of the next 82 nights or something like that. and the terror bombing they feared and predicted began. and there was no stopping the bombers. host: how many were killed and how many wounded in great brita britain? guest: i think about 40,000 to 45,000 londoners and 60,000 throughout then the rockets came. 60,000 people in a country of 47 million, you extrapolate, that would be at the time almost 2 200,000 americans, unimaginable numbers then and now for us in the united states. host: physically what did winston do during that time, where did he live? how did he relate to london and great bri
fathers had in mind, i believe. i do not think government is there to prop us all up, because then there would not be a safety net left for the people in life who really need it. the disabled, people who fall on hard times and need a little help along the way, but i feel as though government now has opinion, for how we live our life and conduct business. >> go back to that table you used to sit around at home. where was it? who sat around the table? what did your mom or dad do? >> i grew up in virginia. when we all got home from school, my dad got home from work and mom was always cooking mostly a good meal. it was a time when we all sat down. i remember watching walter cronkite at the time during the costas -- hostage crisis. we would talk about current events, grades, what was going on at school and in our lives. we sat around the table as a family. was a meaningful thing to me. left a strong imprint on my life even to this day as an adult. when i am with my family, we sit at home and talk about current events and what is going on in our lives. as a country, we have got away
part in a form on how education and innovation can benefit the us economy. the google vice president also participates. the center for american progress host the line -- live event i'm a tomorrow on c-span. >> this week, crystal wright, editor and publisher of the internet blog site, conservativeblackchick.com. >> crystal wright, why did you call your blog "conservative black chick." >> not a big story behind that. i felt it illustrated who i was. it is literal and fun. i was at a reunion for my all-- alma mater. a good friend of mine said i should just do my own blog. >> when did you start? >> 2009. i started blogging in 2009. i was very frustrated by barack obama's election. he ran as a moderate democrat. to pull people in the red state of virginia turn blue, i said, this is interesting. in january, he began to make his appointments and i began to see the same faces of the clinton administration. i became increasingly frustrated. obamacare is what hit me over the edge. i said, why is this president not focusing on job creation? people do not want universal health care rig
's heads, had no use for suffering, was not very sympathetic. >> mary stone is his daughter, who i understand is still alive. you interviewed her? >> i have spoken to her and #times. yes, indeed by telephone. wrote letters. she road very long letters. i call these feature story questions. what did you get your father for christmas? what did he get you? >> and she wrote you answers? >> yes. 7 pages. very nice. >> here is a clip of her from 1997. >> my father -- and i loved him very much. when he retired as prime minister, he made a speech to the house of commons, a long speech. the secretary on duty at the time -- he dictated every word himself. then, after he retired, you know the last 10 years of his life, a fire rather like burning. sometimes the flames would spring up. other times the fire would be rather low. >> when did he die? >> january of 1965. lady soames inherited her father's literary talents. that was a very beautiful, powerful 30 seconds there. his last private secretary wrote a memoir called a " the long sun sets -- "the long sunset" about those years. that being said
would take the methodologies that i would use in that book and try to come up with a good explanation of the realignment of 1775. that is a good part of what this new book is about. >> before we get into this, a number of years ago, he called you a liberal. we have known you over the years as supposedly a conservative. give us your own views on liberal conservatives now. i was always a bit more of a populist. i don't think i have ever been what i would call a liberal. somebody might call me a progressive. certainly even within the republican party. outsider, and antiestablishmentarian. >> what did you think of richard nixon when you worked with him? >> i liked him better after i wasn't working with him and he was out of the presidency. he is a very intelligent man, a man with enormous personal problems in terms of relating to people. and i understand much better, which i did not a time when i worked for him, how he was not an effective administrator and how he couldn't keep all those worms in the can, whether you are talking about the administration or especially watergate. >> how did
.: it pretty much did emerge. i thought i would take the methodology that i used in the book to try to, with a good explanation, a realignment of 1775. that is a good part of what this new book is about. >> before we get into this, would you deal with one comment that i saw on the web written by weisburg a number of years ago. he called you a liberal. >> i don't think i have ever been what i would call a liberal. somebody might call me a progressive. certainly even within the republican party for a long time there was a major progressive movements. but, liberal, i don't think so. outsider, antiestablishment, but not liberal and not merely conservative either. i would not accept either of those labels. i understand it does not stop with those labels. in terms of the political labels, i don't think i really have one that works terribly well at this point. to correct what did you think of richard nixon when you worked with him? >> i liked him better after i was not working for him and he was out of the presidency. i kept up with him quite a bit. if obviously a very intelligent man, a man
begins his second term in office what is the most important issue to consider in 2013? tell us. make a shord video about your message to the president. it is c-span's student video competition with the chance to win a grand prize of $5,000 and $50,000 in total prizes. go to studentcam.org. >> winston spendser churchill, defender of the realm. 1940 to 1965. host: paul reid, co-author with william manchester of the last lion, the third of a trilogy, if you could have dinner with winston chump -- churchill and ask him a series of questions what would they be? >> he didn't like strangers and didn't like the press and didn't give anything away. i would ask him about his religious beliefs or lack thereof. i found that fascinating. he read plato and airs as to thele and cyst -- cicero but he made himself into a classical man. he lived a life in accordance with the precursor to the christian ethic we find in plato and greek gloves and humanist but godless ethic. th then, let's see. the second front. i would like him to have the final word because we americans have set him up for the decade
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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